Blogs & Comment

Financial advice and fiduciary duties

Financial advisors and planners need to uphold the very highest of standards.

Most of us rely on accredited professionals for a range of services. Doctors, lawyers, accountants and so on play a huge role in our lives, giving us advice and rendering services that we would be foolish to provide for ourselves. Some topics, in other words, are beyond the ken of even the dedicated do-it-yourselfer. Financial planning is in that category. If you plan to do anything much beyond storing your money in a mattress, you probably want help from a professional. And you hope—really, really hope—that professional is on the ball and has your best interests at heart.

A recent story highlights some of the difficulties in this regard. In the United States, an independent insurance agent is currently facing jail time for selling a particular kind of investment—an indexed annuity—to an 83-year-old woman. The catch: prosecutors say the woman showed signs of dementia, and the implication is that the agent took advantage of the fact that the buyer may not have understood the limits and disadvantages of the investment instrument she was buying.

Even minus the question of the buyer’s competency, there are worries here. For perspective on this story, I talked to Prof. John Boatright, author of the leading book on ethics in finance. He pointed out to me that Equity-Indexed Annuities are so complex that they’re a dubious product quite generally. He also pointed out that such annuities are investment instruments sold by people in the insurance industry who are not truly investment specialists. Most investment instruments are regulated such that they can only be sold by investment professionals with suitable training and credentials.

But regardless of the kind of professional you go to for investment advice, the underlying ethical question is whether that professional is going to have your best interests at heart. When the product you’re buying is too complex to understand, you have to put your trust in the seller. Such trust is best underpinned by what are called fiduciary duties. A fiduciary, roughly speaking, is someone to whom something of value is entrusted. And a professional who bears a fiduciary duty has a stronger obligation than a mere salesman. Someone out to sell you something—a car, a stereo, whatever—has a plain obligation not to deceive you, but generally isn’t obligated to make sure that the product is right for you. Whether the product is right for you is up to you to decide. But a fiduciary is held to a higher standard. As ethics professor Alexei Marcoux points out, we are vulnerable in various ways to professionals of various kinds, and that vulnerability generates duties on the part of those professionals, not just to be honest to us but to put our interests first. The transaction between a professional and a client is not a regular market transaction; rather, it is (or ought to be) governed by the higher standard implied by a fiduciary relationship.

Whether financial advisors and financial planners proclaim and live up to such a high standard is another matter. It certainly seems they should. In some places, financial professionals are explicitly expected to live up to the standard applied by a fiduciary duty, and other jurisdictions are moving in that direction. In Canada, financial advisors are bound by a “Know Your Client” rule, but whether they have a full-blown fiduciary duty, legally, is as I understand it a question of circumstance. And in the U.S. they are held to a “Suitability” standard, which is seen as somewhat more lax than a fiduciary standard.

In either case, a situation in which we are trusting a stranger to tell us what to do with our life’s savings is one that requires adherence to a fiduciary duty.