Oil and gas industry applauds Supreme Court’s dismissal of B.C. TMX case

 

The Supreme Court of Canada is shown in Ottawa on January 19, 2018. Canada's high court will hear arguments Thursday on whether British Columbia can stop Alberta from shipping heavy oil through the Trans Mountain pipeline without a permit. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

OTTAWA — The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers says it is pleased, but not surprised, by the Supreme Court ruling that shut down British Columbia’s attempt to regulate what can flow through an expanded Trans Mountain pipeline.

Tim McMillan, CEO and president of Canada’s largest oil and gas industry association, says the project has undergone historic levels of consultation, reviews and court challenges.

He says it has been found to be in the best interests of Canadians.

The B.C. government wanted to require provincial permits before heavy oil could be shipped to the province through pipelines from Alberta.

The Supreme Court decision upholds a B.C. Court of Appeal ruling that said such permits would violate Ottawa’s authority under the Constitution to approve and regulate pipelines that cross provincial boundaries.

The high court’s ruling Thursday removes one of the remaining obstacles for the project that aims to twin an existing pipeline that runs between the Edmonton area and Burnaby, B.C.

Natural Resources Minister Seamus O’Regan welcomed the ruling, saying it is a core responsibility of the federal government to help get resources to market and support good, middle-class jobs.

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney said he looks forward to construction continuing on the project and Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe says the pipeline is in the interests of all Canadians.

B.C. Premier John Horgan expressed the province’s disappointment, saying his government will do what it can to protect the B.C. coast and environment.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 17, 2020.

The Canadian Press

Comments are closed.