Strategy

MBA student profile: The linebacker

While the rest of the team laughed and played cards aboard their chartered flights, CFL linebacker Javier Glatt, now 31, had his head in the books.

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(Photo: Grant Harder)

Javier Glatt, Beedie Graduate School of Business, Simon Fraser University

While the rest of the team laughed and played cards aboard their chartered flights, CFL linebacker Javier Glatt, now 31, had his head in the books. “I’d be like, ‘Keep it down out there! I’m trying to learn cash flow!’” he says. After eight years on the field, seven of those with the B.C. Lions, where in 2006 he won a Grey Cup—and all the injuries that go with it, including a torn ACL, broken leg, dislocated ankle, torn pectoral muscle—Calgary-born Glatt was ready for a change. “I started growing as a person and becoming interested in things that weren’t football,” he says. “Then I looked around at so many of my ex-teammates and current teammates who had basically zero plans for transitioning out of the sport. So many guys struggle with that, and I vowed not to let it happen to me.” With an undergrad in sociology from UBC, and an admittedly not-so-stellar record as a student, Glatt began a graduate diploma in business administration from the Beedie School of Business at Simon Fraser University. This time around, learning came more naturally. “School at 30 is a little different than school at 20—you’re actually interested, you love learning, you have a new perspective,” he says. Though he didn’t think so at the time, it turns out football left Glatt with some choice business skills: a strong work ethic, goal-setting, accountability and—perhaps most important—leadership. “Professional football is a breeding ground for leaders, and those leadership skills can be quite valuable in the business world,” he explains. Glatt placed very well in the program, transferred into a full-time MBA program, and graduated with a gig at Goldcorp in Vancouver. His newest challenge, he says, is balancing a full-time job with his wife and young daughter, who just turned one. “I’ve been used to a lifestyle where you finish at two o’clock every day and get six months off, so next I’m learning about time management.”

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