Lifestyle

How-to: Grooming and wellness

Buying a tux, wearing heels, avoiding illness and more.

How to wear a scent

Generally speaking, don’t. But if you must, tread very lightly. ‘You want a light hint of scent,’ says Tania Kwong, beauty editor at Glow magazine. ‘Strong aromas can trigger migraines for some, so it’s best to play it safe when you’re at work.’ Kwong advises opting for fresh scents such as citrus or soft florals. Also, avoid concentrated perfumes. Instead, spritz an eau de toilette lightly into the air and walk through the mist. Work-friendly fragrances include Eau de Fleurs by Chloe and Prada’s Infusion D’Homme for men.

How to not get sick

1. Never skip a meal, says Dr. Elaine Chin, chief medical officer of Scienta Health Group in Toronto, and make sure you have a well-rounded diet. Fuel up frequently, or your immune system will lag.

2. Eat a diet rich in lean proteins. A protein deficiency can affect hormone production and compromise immune function.

3. Sleeping at least seven to eight hours a night will help the body ward off infection.

4. Avoid stress due to overworking.

5. Exercise keeps your immune system robust by improving blood flow, which flushes out your system.

How to shop for a tuxedo

The investment: Expect to spend $750-$1,200 for a high-quality, one-button classic tux with satin lapel, says Craig Dellio of Perry’s in Yorkville. A bespoke model will start at $1,900.

The accessories: A bow tie and cummerbund with cufflinks and studs are traditional. Wear with buttons and a tie for what Dellio calls the ‘Hollywood look.’

The jacket: A satin peak lapel creates a V shape that accentuates the shoulders. ‘It has a very complimentary effect on almost all figures,’ says Dellio.

The pant: Opt for a flat front pant with a satin braid (the strip down the side). The hem should be angled down toward your heel. No cuffs!

The shoe: Wear a black patentleather slip-on or a plain high-polish lace-up shoe.

How to iron a dress shirt

Step 1: Take the shirt out of the dryer while it is slightly damp. Start with the right front panel draped over the side of the ironing board and rotate the shirt clockwise until the left front panel is pressed.

Step 2: Wrap the shoulder piece — called the yoke of the shirt — over the pointed end of the ironing board and press. Then lay the sleeve flat with the seam closest to you and press.

Step 3: Unbutton the cuffs and lay them flat, with the inside of the cuff facing up, and press so that there is no crease. Open the collar and lay flat with the inside of the shirt facing up and press.

How to arrive on time and rested

Alarm clocks are crude instruments, jolting you awake at an appointed time no matter where you are in your natural sleep cycle (the continuous flow between deep sleep and brief, nearly conscious moments). The Sleeptracker Pro (US$179) contains sensors that monitor body movements during the night, tracking the wearer’s sleep cycle. Set an ‘alarm window’ and the watch will choose the optimal moment in your cycle to rouse you feeling rested and refreshed.

How to find a pair of heels you can wear all day long

Cole Haan: The Carma Air Sling 55 has Nike Air technology and a low heel US$278

‘[The problem] is not the heel,’ says Dr. Elaine Chin, chief medical officer of Scienta Health Group in Toronto. ‘It’s really about your arch and your ability to balance, to make sure you get the right angle to support the height.’ She advises women who wear heels to have their feet assessed by a podiatrist. ‘A modest heel — an inch or inch-and-a-half — plus an orthotic should not be problematic for people with healthy backs,’ says Chin.

How to do your hair like:

Heather Reisman, CEO of Indigo Books & Music: ‘Her look is a clean classic cut,’ says Toronto stylist Robert Gage. ‘It’s very thoroughbred.’ There is some shaping, but the edges are blunt. It’s beautifully shaded, he says — a warm honey feel.

Indra Nooyi, CEO PepsiCo: ‘It’s a flattering classic shape,’ says Gage, ‘It does great things for her face.’ A really good shampoo and conditioner can get this kind of body. She probably uses volumizer and a blow-dryer to style it.

Joan Holloway, office manager, Sterling Cooper: This up-do, a French roll, can be done by blow-drying, setting with a few rollers, and pinning it up. ‘The look is very groomed,’ says Gage. These days, when people try to put their hair up, ‘it’s a bit of a mess.’

Jamie Dimon, CEO of JPMorgan Chase & Co: This is a very simple, middle of the road cut, says Gage. He has allowed his hair to go grey, and it looks a little overgrown. ‘Obviously, the haircut is less successful than he is,’ says Gage.

Don Draper, creative director, Sterling Cooper: Longer on top, short on the sides and the back, and trimmed right off the neck. It requires a lot of effort because it can’t grow past 2 ? to three weeks, says Gage. To style, slick back with gel or pomade.

Richard Branson, chairman of Virgin Group: ‘It looks messy, but it’s very well cut,’ says Gage. ‘There’s a lot of haircut in his haircut.’ For colour, he has blended highlights into his natural hair, says Gage. ‘It comes across as a sort of silver blond.’

How to look good in a photo

The professional: Opt for a natural-looking pose and a subdued face. Engage the photographer.

The odd angler: Don’t tilt your head too low (double chin effect) or look straight on (wide face effect).

The goofball: Some think a big, toothy grin says, “I’m friendly.” It actually says something else.

The over-poser: It’s easy for business portraits to look cliche. Avoid the cutesy face or the pompous musing face.

Let’s bring back … Job interview hygiene

“I personally always look at a man’s shoes. If he can’t clean his shoes, he is not likely to serve me very well. Men also forget that a smart head is a guide to character. Long hair looks slovenly or ‘arty-crafty.’ Too elaborate a style of hair-dressing is suspicious … Dirty nails and nicotine stained fingers are disgusting.”
—Barbara Cartland’s Etiquette Handbook, 1962

How to boost your energy

People who work in offices often tend to get sluggish in the afternoons. The key, says Dr. Chin, is to “identify the type of fuel you need for the type of activity you do.” If you are sedentary, for example, eating too many carbohydrates will lead to a sugar low — you’ll likely feel sleepy 1? to two hours after eating. Dr. Chin recommends eating lean proteins, like low-fat yogurt or sliced turkey and low-fat cheese, which give three to four hours of energy and, unlike carbs, are not stored as fats. Protein also provides B vitamins, which Chin says a lot of people are lacking. (Whole grains are another source.) “B vitamins are critical in helping to reduce the instance of stress, and chronic stress gets us tired,” says Chin. Finally, she says, avoid stimulants such as caffeine, “because what goes up, must come down.”

How to freshen up on the fly
Glow‘s Tania Kwong says always keep these items handy:

Flosser: Oral-B, $9

Mouthwash: Scope, $5

Hand cream: Clarins, $33

Brush: Stylize, $17

Deoderant: Nivea, $4

Facial wipes: Neutrogena, $12

Nail file: Revlon, $14

Lip balm: Dr. Hauschka, $18